Gymnosperm!

This tree is commonly known as the Blue Spruce. Its scientific name is Picea pungens.

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The Blue spruce is an important gymnosperm because it provides cover for many bird and animal species. It is also very important because certain species of birds feed on their seeds. Along with this, squirrels love their cones. It is the relationships they have with other animals that make them such a key component in an ecosystem. 

 

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Gymnosperm!

This mighty tree is known to us as the Douglas Fir, however, it’s scientific name is Pseudotsuga menziesii.

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Douglas firs are a major component of succession in the forest. Since they have almost no seedlings and cannot grow in the shade. Thus, when a tree dies the canopy opens up and sunlight becomes available as a source of energy for new growth. Now, the seedlings from other species that can thrive in the shade can get a head start. Meanwhile, the Douglas Firs are struggling. This results in trees such as the western hemlock dominating the canopy of a lowland rainforest.

Angiosperm

This angiosperm is known as Euphorbia cyparissias.

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Certain species of Euphorbia have been used in ayurvedic treatments for centuries. It has been known to aid our respiratory system, as well as our skin and digestive system. The modern day to Ayurvedic treatments have even produced mainstream supplements that contain Euphorbia.

Angiosperm

This plant is called Hosta undulata albomarginata… try saying that 5 times fast.

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Did you know, this angiosperm is the number one perennial in all of North America? Although they don’t look very special they actually have really strong defense mechanisms to avoid predators. They contain a chemical called Saponin, which causes them to be very high in toxicity. 

 

Angiosperm!

This beautiful flower is commonly known as the bluebell. Its real name is Hyacinthoides non-scripta… that’s a mouthful.

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This awesome flower was first discovered in 1753 by Carl Linnaeus. Be careful with these flowers because although they are very nice to look at they also contain glycosides and are poisonous. The sap of this flower can cause contact dermatitis… that doesn’t sound fun.

Angiosperm!

This flower is the beloved tulip. It belongs to the genus Tulipa. This specific type is often known as the Tulipa ‘London’.

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In Canada, tulips symbolize an important part of our history. In the Second World War Canadian troops played a major role in the liberation of the Netherlands. Thus, in 1945 Princess Juliana of the Netherlands presented 100,000 tulips to Ottawa as a thank you for all their help and hard work. The annual Canadian tulip festival has continued on from 1953 as a symbol of Canadian pride.

Angiosperm

These flowers are commonly known as Rhododendron. However, this particular species is called Rhododendron wardii. 

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The Rhododendron flower is the national flower of Nepal. They use the leaves in many Buddhist monasteries. Research and studies has also showed that the flower possesses antimicrobial properties. 

Angiosperm!

 

We all know this flower as the good ol’ dandelion. Despite this, its scientific name is Taraxacum officinale

 

 

 

Although it may seem strange a dandelion contains lots of great vitamins. They are very high in vitamin A and C and they also possess more beta-carotene than carrots and even more potassium than spinach and broccoli! It is believed that dandelions help improve the health of our kidneys. That’s why drinking dandelion tea is really awesome for indigestion! Looks like the dandelion’s not just a pretty face.

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